Generator Category

Any business that generates non-household hazardous waste must determine their generator category. A generator's category is based on the amount of hazardous waste generated in a calendar month, and it may change from month to month. The Vermont Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (VHWMR) set forth procedures to determine whether a generator is a large quantity generator, small quantity generator, or very small quantity generator for a particular month. The VHWMR specifically apply to businesses (non-household waste generators) that generate hazardous waste; household hazardous waste is not regulated by the Vermont Hazardous Waste Program under the VHWMR.

State and federal hazardous waste regulations classify hazardous waste generators into three categories based on the amount of hazardous waste generated each calendar month. In Vermont, these categories are:

Generator Category 

Quantity of Acute Hazardous Waste Generated in a Calendar Month

Quantity of non-acute Hazardous Waste Generated in a Calendar Month

Quantity of Residues from a Cleanup of Hazardous Waste Generated in a Calendar Month 

Large Quantity Generator > 1 kg (2.2 pounds Any amount Any amount
Large Quantity Generator Any amount ≥ 1,000 kg (2,200 pounds) Any amount
Large Quantity Generator Any amount Any amount ≤ 100 kg (220 pounds)
Small Quantity Generator ≤ 1 kg (2.2 pounds) > 100 kg (220 pounds) and          <1,000 kg (2,200 pounds) ≤ 100 kg (220 pounds)
Very Small Quantity Generator ≤ 1 kg (2.2 pounds) ≤ 100 kg (220 pounds) ≤ 100 kg (220 pounds)

Key Considerations when Determining Generator Category:

  • Generator Category is determined based on the amount of hazardous waste generated per month, and not the amount of hazardous waste stored or shipped in a particular month.

  • Exempt wastes do not count toward generator status. Exempted wastes are listed and discussed in Subchapter 2 of the VHWMR.
  • Used oil can be managed according to the standards outlined in Subchapter 8  of the VHWMR, and universal wastes (i.e., batteries, certain pesticides, mercury thermostats, PCB-containing fluorescent light ballasts, lamps, mercury-containing devices, CRTs, postconsumer paint, and aersol cans) can be managed under the standards outlined in Subchapter 9. These should not be counted when calculating generator status.

  • For pharmaceutical wastes, a person shall count all hazardous waste except hazardous waste pharmaceuticals that are subject to and managed in accordance with Subchapter 10 of the VHWMR.

  • Any hazardous waste that is reclaimed and subsequently reused on-site only needs to be counted as being generated one time. Please note that if reclamation involves generator treatment, a Generator Treatment Form must be completed.

Generator treatment is defined as: any method, technique, or process, including neutralization, designed to change the physical, chemical or biological character or composition of any hazardous or solid waste, so as to neutralize such waste, or so as to recover energy or material resources from the waste, or so as to render such waste safer for transport, amenable for recovery, amenable for storage, or reduced in volume, or for hazardous wastes, so as to render such waste non-hazardous. Examples include but are not limited to: distillation, neutralization, compaction. 

Tags: 

Agency of Natural Resources
Department of Environmental Conservation
Waste Management and Prevention Division

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