geology

Glacial Lakes, Central Vermont

Text and images amended from G. Springston, S. Wright, and C. Dowey.glacial lakes, central VermontThe surficial geologic materials in central Vermont were mostly deposited during the Wisconsinan glaciation in glacial or periglacial environments existing during or shortly after the Laurentide ice sheet retreated across this area ~14,000–13,500 years ago (Ridge et al., 2012; Corbett et al., 2018). The ice sheet was sufficiently thick to completely cover the mountains.

Radon

Radon is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas that forms naturally from the radioactive decay of uranium in rocks, surficial materials, and soils over millions of years. After formation, radon can move through fractures and layering in rocks or through connected pores in surficial materials and soils and enter a home through the foundation. Exposure to radon in indoor air is estimated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to be the second leading cause of lung cancer, with smoking being the first.

Open File Reports

vista from mountaintop

Open File reports include 1:24,000 scale bedrock, surficial, and groundwater maps published between 1963 and the present.  Open File reports have a minimal level of review for conformance with editorial standards.  All interpretations are those of the author. Most recent maps are Open File reports and include GIS data.

Environmental Geology Reports, 1971-1975

The Environmental GeologyReport series are simplified versions of maps of bedrock and surficial materials, construction conditions, groundwater potential, solid waste disposal, sand and gravel reserves, and septic conditions. The series, developed for planning purposes, includes text and regional information.

Env Geology No 1: Geology for Environmental Planning in the Barre-Montpelier Region, Vermont, DP Stewart, 1971, 5 plates plus text 

Bedrock Geologic Map of Vermont, 2011

Reference: Ratcliffe, NM, Stanley, RS, Gale, MH, Thompson, PJ, and Walsh, GJ, 2011, Bedrock Geologic Map of Vermont: USGS Scientific Investigations Series Map 3184, 3 sheets, scale 1:100,000.  
To order a paper copy of the map (3 52"x72" sheets), send a check for $46.00 and your address to the Vermont Geological Survey,1 National Life Dr., Main 2, Montpelier, VT 05620-3902

History of the Vermont Geological Survey & the State Geologist Gallery

The mission of producing a geological and mineralogical survey of the state guided the establishment of the Vermont Geological Survey. This Survey would provide a full scientific examination and description of the state's rocks, soils, metals and minerals. Charles B. Adams (1814-1853) was appointed the first Vermont State Geologist by Governor William Slade in March of 1845. The survey progressed slowly over the years due to little funding. Several annual reports were published, but the first geologic map of Vermont was not completed until 1861.

Asbestos

Asbestos minerals are found in the serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The larger bodies are composed of central cores of massive dunite and peridotite which grade outward to massive or sheared serpentinite. Chrysotile asbestos occurs as cross-fiber veins in the more massive portions of the ultramafic bodies and as slip-fibers in the highly sheared serpentinites (Ratte, 1982).

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