rivers

Vermont Stream Alteration Rule

10 March 2017
The Stream Alteration Rule regulates activities that take place in or along streams. A permit is required for movement, excavation, or fills involving 10 or more cubic yards annually in any perennial stream. Permits are intended to prevent the creation of flood hazards, protect against damages to aquatic life, and protect the rights of neighboring landowners. The types of activities that are regulated include streambank stabilization, road improvements that encroach on streams, bridge construction or repair, and utility crossings under streambeds. This Rule applies to stream alterations in both emergency and non-emergency circumstances.

Vermont Standard River management Principles and Practices

12 June 2015
This document defines practices and decision-making processes to assist state and federal agencies, municipalities, non profit organizations, and landowners with river management techniques that reduce future flood and erosion risks. This document is needed to break the cycle of flood recovery activities that leave post-flood river channels located near public infrastructure and private property more impacted and more vulnerable to damages from future flooding.

Agency Procedure for Determining Acceptable Minimum Stream Flows

14 July 1993
The intent of this procedure is to assure a consistent process is used in determining acceptable minimum stream flows when there are existing or potential competing uses of the water. This does not necessarily mean that a uniform minimum stream flow number will be reached in every case. What it does mean is that the minimum stream flow numbers will be derived using a consistent procedure.

Monitoring

The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation's Watershed Management Division monitors the water quality of lakes, ponds, rivers, streams, and wetlands across Vermont. These monitoring activities are carried out in conjunction with Vermont's Water Quality Monitoring Program Strategy and are outlined in our Field Methods Manual. This strategy spells out several objectives, which include the following:

Dam Removal

Dam SiteDam removal has in recent years been used as a tool to restore rivers while addressing the on-going problems of aging, and deteriorating, infrastructure. Of the 1,200 known dams in Vermont, many no longer serve a useful purpose and impose legal and financial burdens on their owners. In some cases, removal of these dams makes sense for economic, public safety, ecological or social reasons.

After a Flood

Information for Flood-Damaged Communities

If you have a home or business that has been flooded, please visit (enter link to DEMHS or FEMA page)

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - rivers