Trash can logo and Trash being tipped in a pile at transfer station

Trash Disposal

Items banned from disposal in the State of Vermont

Landfill ban disposal poster
Download a landfill ban poster.

According to Vermont State Law (10 V.S.A. § 6621a), no person shall knowingly dispose of any of the following materials in  their household trash or in landfills:

  • Lead-acid batteries (1990)
  • Waste oil (1990)
  • "White goods," or large appliances... (1991)
  • Paint, oil-based and latex... (1991)
  • Tires (1992)
  • Nickel-cadmium batteries, small sealed lead-acid batteries, non-consumer mercuric oxide batteries (1992)
  • Mercury-added products (2007)
  • Electronic devices... (2011)
  • Mandated recyclables... Effective July 1, 2015
  • Leaf and yard debris, clean wood Effective July 1, 2016
  • Food residuals Effective July 1, 2020 *

*Businesses and institutions producing more than 1/3 ton of food residuals per week may be required to comply with landfill ban before 2020. See Universal Recycling Law page for details.

Current Landfills Operating in State of Vermont

New England Waste Services Landfill | Coventry, Vermont
Permitted Acceptance Rate: 600,000 tons per year
Status: Operating

Salisbury Landfill | Salisbury, Vermont
Permitted Acceptance Rate: 1,000 tons per year
Status: Operating, unlined

Find the location of a transfer station or drop-off center near you. Use the Materials Management Map

Don't Burn Vermont!

Trash burning is harmful to you and your family, as well as your neighbors. 

The chemicals created and released by trash burning have been scientifically shown to increase your risk of many health problems, like heart disease, asthma, emphysema, headaches and even cancer.

Kids are especially at risk. 

Reasearch has proven that kids absorb up to six times more pollution through their lungs than adults breathing the same air. Not only that, but they are more at risk than adults because their immune systems aren't yet fully developed.

It's illegal, too. 

State and municipal officials may issue penalties to individuals who continue to burn trash. Violators are subject to monetary fines as well as performing community roadside cleanup. If violators fail to pay their fine, their driving license will be suspended for a period of ten days and they will lose their hunting and/or fishing license privileges for a period of one year.

Illegal Dumping and Littering

Roadside dumping of trash threatens waterways, wildlife, and public health.

Trash contains heavy metals and other noxious substances that contaminate local watersheds and water supplies that towns rely on for clean drinking water. Animals are also at risk of eating or getting caught in plastics and metal scraps. 

It's illegal, too. 

Similarly to burning trash, state and municipal officials may issue penalties to individuals who dump trash on lands or waters outside of a transfer station that is certified to accept trash. Violators are subject to fines up to $500, and performing community roadside cleanup. If violators fail to pay their fine, their driving license will be suspended for a period of ten days and they will lose their hunting and/or fishing license privileges for a period of one year. Note: Food scraps and leaf & yard debris may be managed in backyard compost piles. 

What You Can Do to Keep Vermont Clean

  1. DO NOT BURN TRASH. DO NOT DUMP TRASH in roadside ditches, swamps, abandoned quarries, or any open lands.
     
  2. REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE
    • REDUCE the amount of waste you create by buying products with less packaging and buying items that last longer instead of disposable ones. REUSE the durable packaging you get (wash out that sour cream container and use it to put leftovers in). RECYCLE all the materials you can, like cardboard, newspapers, cans and bottles. Learn more about how to recycle in Vermont.

  3. TAKE YOUR TRASH TO THE TRANSFER STATION
    • Instead of burning or illegally dumping your trash, take it to your local transfer station. It only takes a few minutes to jump in your car or truck and haul it there, and it's much better for you and everyone around you. Or call a local solid waste hauler to provide pick-up from your curb!
       
  4. SPREAD THE WORD!
    • You can really help make a difference by letting your friends and neighbors know about the dangers of burning trash and the safe alternatives.

Agency of Natural Resources
Department of Environmental Conservation
Waste Management and Prevention Division

Davis Building - 1st Floor
One National Life Drive
Montpelier, VT 05620-3704
802-828-1138