public drinking water systems

Vermont Water Supply Rule

01 December 2010
This rule is intended to serve a number of purposes. First, and most important, the rule's primary purpose is to regulate water systems in the state so that they provide clean and safe drinking water to Vermont's citizens. This is true for the smallest, single house source to the state's largest system. The rule also establishes well construction standards (contained in Part 12 of Appendix A) which apply to every constructed well in Vermont regardless of the type of facility it serves. Second, by implementing this rule, Vermont qualifies to retain "primacy" for the Safe Drinking Water Act from the federal US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Primacy means that the state will administer the federal regulations that apply to all public water systems in the country, instead of EPA. Without state regulations that are at least as strict as the federal ones, Vermont may not administer the federal regulations. We think having primacy represents an advantage to Vermont's water systems. The federal regulations contain some optional provisions that permit exceptions to the regulations when mitigating factors make it difficult or impossible to follow the regulation. Also, there are situations where interpretations of the federal regulations can be made by states with primacy that provide some benefit to the public water systems. EPA has stated that, in the event that they have to administer their own rules in a state without primacy, they will not have the resources to provide most of these permitted exceptions to the regulations. Third, this document contains all of the state's major regulations concerning water systems in a single document, which, in spite of its size, makes it easier for both the regulators and the regulated community to carry out their respective roles. The Agency will bind the various parts of the rule (discussed below) into smaller packages that make sense for the intended recipient.

Capacity Development Program

Our mission is to help public water systems become more sustainable by improving their technical, managerial, and financial capabilities.  

Fees, Applications and Permits

Various certifications and permits required by either state or federal rules and regulations. Permits for various wastewater and drinking water programs are linked below along with certifications and licenses for individuals.

Source Water Permitting

All Public Water Supply Systems (PCWS, NTNC, TNC, Domestic Bottled/Bulk Water) are required to have a source water permit for any new source, hydrofracturing or deepening of an existing source, or any increase in withdrawal of an existing source.  Applicants for this permit must comply with the Water Supply Rule Chapter 21 and if applying for a Domestic Bottled or Bulk Water Permit, it must also comply with the requirements of the Groun

Sanitary Surveys at TNC Water Systems

The Environmental Protection Agency defines a sanitary survey as “an onsite review of the water source, facilities, equipment, operation, and maintenance of a Public Water System for the purpose of evaluating the adequacy of such source, facilities, equipment, operation and maintenance for producing and distributing safe drinking water.” (40 CFR) The purpose of a sanitary survey is to ensure that the water system is operating in a manner that provides safe drinking water from the source to the tap.

Public Drinking Water Systems

Public Water System is defined as any source(s) or combination of sources owned or controlled by a person, that provides drinking water through pipes or other constructed conveyances to the public and that has at least fifteen (15) service connections or serves an average of at least twenty-five (25) individuals daily for at least sixty (60) days out of the year.

DWSRF Water Planning Loan

The DWSRF Planning loan program provides 0% interest loans to public water systems seeking to conduct preliminary and final design engineering. This preliminary engineering can run the gamut from source exploration to feasibility studies for water system acquisition to preliminary and final design of a construction project. One of the most attractive aspects of the planning loan program is the loans accrue no interest and require no payments on the loan until the project goes to construction; if construction does not occur, payment of the loan occurs over a five year period.

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