geology

Open File Reports

vista from mountaintop

Open File reports include 1:24,000 scale bedrock, surficial, and groundwater maps published between 1963 and the present.  Open File reports are preliminary and have not been reviewed for conformance with editorial standards.  All interpretations are those of the author. Most recent  maps are Open File reports and include GIS data.

Environmental Geology Reports, 1971-1975

The Environmental GeologyReport series are simplified versions of maps of bedrock and surficial materials, construction conditions, groundwater potential, solid waste disposal, sand and gravel reserves, and septic conditions. The series, developed for planning purposes, includes text and regional information.

Env Geology No 1: Geology for Environmental Planning in the Barre-Montpelier Region, Vermont, DP Stewart, 1971, 5 plates plus text 

History of the Vermont Geological Survey & the State Geologist Gallery

The mission of producing a geological and mineralogical survey of the state guided the establishment of the Vermont Geological Survey. This Survey would provide a full scientific examination and description of the state's rocks, soils, metals and minerals. Charles B. Adams (1814-1853) was appointed the first Vermont State Geologist by Governor William Slade in March of 1845. The survey progressed slowly over the years due to little funding. Several annual reports were published, but the first geologic map of Vermont was not completed until 1861.

Asbestos

Asbestos minerals are found in the serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The larger bodies are composed of central cores of massive dunite and peridotite which grade outward to massive or sheared serpentinite. Chrysotile asbestos occurs as cross-fiber veins in the more massive portions of the ultramafic bodies and as slip-fibers in the highly sheared serpentinites (Ratte, 1982).

Radionuclides

Radioactivity - Naturally Occuring in Rock, Soil and Water

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